Aspergillus fumigatus biofilm formation on different bone substitutes used in maxillary sinus augmentation: an in vitro analysis.

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Aspergillus fumigatus biofilm formation on different bone substitutes used in maxillary sinus augmentation: an in vitro analysis.

Int J Implant Dent. 2019 Jun 20;5(1):22

Authors: Stacchi C, Del Lupo V, Berton F, Lombardi T, Bressan R, Di Lenarda R, Lagatolla C

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Fungus ball (FB) typically affects healthy adults, and Aspergillus fumigatus is the most frequent etiologic agent: iatrogenic factors represent an important issue in FB pathogenesis. Moreover, a recent study suggested a significant association between the use of anorganic bovine bone as sinus grafting material and subsequent development of FB. The aim of the present investigation is to evaluate in vitro eventual differences in the ability of Aspergillus fumigatus to colonize different bone grafting materials and grow on them as biofilm.
FINDINGS: Five different bone substitutes (demineralized bone matrix, anorganic bovine bone, ß-tricalcium phosphate, synthetic nano-hydroxyapatite, and synthetic hydroxyapatite), commonly used in sinus floor augmentation procedures, were inoculated with conidia suspensions of A. fumigatus and incubated at 37 °C for 4 and 8 h, in standardized conditions. Biofilm bound to the different materials underwent quantitative and qualitative analysis by confocal and scanning electron microscopy. A. fumigatus proved to be able to adhere and form biofilm on all the tested bone substitutes. The surface plot representation of the samples displayed some differences in the density of the superficial layer, due to the physical characteristics of the biomaterials. Nevertheless, Kruskal-Wallis test showed no significant differences in biomass amount among the five bone substitutes (p = 0.236 and p = 0.55 after 4 and 8 h adhesion, respectively).
CONCLUSIONS: All the bone substitutes normally used in sinus floor augmentation represent a favorable substrate for fungal growth, due to their physical and chemical characteristics. During sinus floor elevation procedures, Schneiderian membrane integrity should be maintained in order to avoid the exposure of the grafting material at the respiratory environment, with potential risks of fungal colonization.

PMID: 31218468 [PubMed]

Source: Industry