Infectious endophthalmitis leading to evisceration: spectrum of bacterial and fungal pathogens and antibacterial susceptibility profile.

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Infectious endophthalmitis leading to evisceration: spectrum of bacterial and fungal pathogens and antibacterial susceptibility profile.

J Ophthalmic Inflamm Infect. 2019 May 16;9(1):9

Authors: Dave TV, Dave VP, Sharma S, Karolia R, Joseph J, Pathengay A, Pappuru RR, Das T

Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe the spectrum of bacterial and fungal pathogens in cases of endophthalmitis requiring evisceration and report their antimicrobial susceptibilities.
METHODS: Retrospective, consecutive, and descriptive case series of endophthalmitis that underwent evisceration from January 2004 to December 2017. Vitreous samples from all patients had been investigated for bacteria and fungus using institutional protocol. Bacterial isolates were identified using analytical profile index (API) system until 2010 and Vitek-2 compact system (bioMérieux, France), thereafter. The susceptibility of bacterial isolates to a variety of antibiotics was determined by the Kirby-Bauer disk-diffusion method.
RESULTS: Of 791 cases reviewed, culture positivity was reported in 388 cases (48.92%). Commonest clinical setting of endophthalmitis necessitating evisceration was post-microbial keratitis (58%), followed by post-trauma and post-cataract surgery (14-15%). The commonest isolate was Streptococcus pneumoniae, seen in 68 samples overall (17.52%). One hundred and eighty-three isolates (47.16%) were gram-positive, 86 (22.16%) were gram-negative, and fungi constituted 137 (35.3%) isolates. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the commonest gram-positive bacterial isolate seen in 68/183 samples (37.15%). Among gram-negative organisms, the commonest was Pseudomonas aeruginosa seen in 47/86 (54.65%). Aspergillus spp. formed the commonest fungal isolate, 58/137 (42.33%). The susceptibility of the gram-positive bacteria was highest with vancomycin, 136/147 (92.51%) and for gram-negative bacteria was seen best with imipenem 24/29 (82.75%). Susceptibility to ceftazidime was 31/61 (50.81%) in 31/61.
CONCLUSION: Endophthalmitis due to Pneumococci, Aspergillus, and Pseudomonas can be very fulminant and progress to require evisceration in spite of prompt and appropriate treatment.

PMID: 31098742 [PubMed]

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