Redesigning the Aspergillus nidulans xylanase regulatory pathway to enhance cellulase production with xylose as the carbon and inducer source.

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Redesigning the Aspergillus nidulans xylanase regulatory pathway to enhance cellulase production with xylose as the carbon and inducer source.

Microb Cell Fact. 2019 Nov 07;18(1):193

Authors: Ballmann P, Lightfoot J, Müller M, Dröge S, Prade R

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Biomass contains cellulose (C6-sugars), hemicellulose (C5-sugars) and lignin. Biomass ranks amongst the most abundant hydrocarbon resources on earth. However, biomass is recalcitrant to enzymatic digestion by cellulases. Physicochemical pretreatment methods make cellulose accessible but partially destroy hemicellulose, producing a C5-sugar-rich liquor. Typically, digestion of pretreated LCB is performed with commercial cellulase preparations, but C5-sugars could in principle be used for “on site” production of cellulases by genetically engineered microorganism, thereby reducing costs.
RESULTS: Here we report a succession of genetic interventions in Aspergillus nidulans that redesign the natural regulatory circuitry of cellulase genes in such a way that recombinant strains use C5-sugar liquors (xylose) to grow a vegetative tissue and simultaneously accumulate large amounts of cellulases. Overexpression of XlnR showed that under xylose-induction conditions only xylanase C was produced. XlnR overexpression strains were constructed that use the xynCp promoter to drive the production of cellobiohydrolases, endoglucanases and β-glucosidase. All five cellulases accumulated at high levels when grown on xylose. Production of cellulases in the presence of pretreated-biomass C5-sugar liquors was investigated, and cellulases accumulated to much higher enzyme titers than those obtained for traditional fungal cell factories with cellulase-inducing substrates.
CONCLUSIONS: By replacing expensive substrates with a cheap by-product carbon source, the use of C5-sugar liquors directly derived from LCB pretreatment processes not only reduces enzyme production costs, but also lowers operational costs by eliminating the need for off-site enzyme production, purification, concentration, transport and dilution.

PMID: 31699093 [PubMed – in process]

Source: Industry