Lethal thrombosis of the iliac artery caused by Aspergillus fumigatus after liver transplantation: case report and review of the literature.

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Lethal thrombosis of the iliac artery caused by Aspergillus fumigatus after liver transplantation: case report and review of the literature.

BMC Surg. 2019 Dec 27;19(1):200

Authors: Gundlach JP, Günther R, Fickenscher H, Both M, Röcken C, Becker T, Braun F

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Aspergillus fumigatus infections frequently occur after solid organ transplantation. Yet, a fungal thrombosis after liver transplantation is an exceptional finding.
CASE PRESENTATION: We report on a 44-year-old female with an aspergillosis after liver transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis. On postoperative day (pod) 7, seizures occurred and imaging diagnostics revealed an intracranial lesion. Anidulafungin was initiated in suspicion of mycosis and switched to voriconazole on suspicion of an Aspergillus spp. infection. Progression of the cerebral lesion prompted craniotomy (pod 48) and the aspergillosis was verified. The patient was discharged with oral voriconazole therapy. Re-admission was necessary with acute-on-chronic renal failure after a tacrolimus overdose on pod 130. The patient received a pelvic angiography due to a temperature difference in the legs. It showed a complete iliac artery thrombosis which was subsecutively surgically removed. The histopathological examination revealed an Aspergillus fumigatus conglomerate. The patient died on pod 210 due to systemic aspergillosis.
CONCLUSION: The acute development of focal neurologic deficits is common in patients with an aspergillosis of the brain. Nevertheless, arterial thrombosis after Aspergillus fumigatus is less frequent and, to the best of our knowledge, its occurrence after liver transplantation has not yet been reported so far. Due to its rarity, we added a review of the literature to this manuscript.

PMID: 31881871 [PubMed – in process]

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