Invasive pseudomembranous upper airway and tracheal Aspergillosis refractory to systemic antifungal therapy and serial surgical debridement in an Immunocompetent patient.

Invasive pseudomembranous upper airway and tracheal Aspergillosis refractory to systemic antifungal therapy and serial surgical debridement in an Immunocompetent patient.

BMC Infect Dis. 2020 Jan 06;20(1):13

Authors: Khan SN, Manur R, Brooks JS, Husson MA, Leahy K, Grant M

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The development of respiratory infections secondary to Aspergillus spp. spores found ubiquitously in the ambient environment is uncommon in immunocompetent patients. Previous reports of invasive upper airway aspergillosis in immunocompetent patients have generally demonstrated the efficacy of treatment regimens utilizing antifungal agents in combination with periodic endoscopic debridement, with symptoms typically resolving within months of initiating therapy.
CASE PRESENTATION: A 43-year-old previously healthy female presented with worsening respiratory symptoms after failing to respond to long-term antibiotic treatment of bacterial sinusitis. Biopsy of her nasopharynx and trachea revealed extensive fungal infiltration and Aspergillus fumigatus was isolated on tissue culture. Several months of oral voriconazole monotherapy failed to resolve her symptoms and she underwent mechanical debridement for symptom control. Following transient improvement, her symptoms subsequently returned and failed to fully resolve in spite of increased voriconazole dosing and multiple additional tissue debridements over the course of many years.
CONCLUSIONS: Invasive upper airway aspergillosis is exceedingly uncommon in immunocompetent patients. In the rare instances that such infections do occur, combinatorial voriconazole and endoscopic debridement is typically an efficacious treatment approach. However, some patients may continue to experience refractory symptoms. In such cases, continued aggressive treatment may potentially slow disease progression even if complete disease resolution cannot be achieved.

PMID: 31906888 [PubMed – in process]

Source: Industry