Advances in Understanding the Acyl-CoA-Binding Protein in Plants, Mammals, Yeast, and Filamentous Fungi.

Related Articles

Advances in Understanding the Acyl-CoA-Binding Protein in Plants, Mammals, Yeast, and Filamentous Fungi.

J Fungi (Basel). 2020 Mar 10;6(1):

Authors: Qiu S, Zeng B

Abstract
Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is an important protein with a size of about 10 kDa. It has a high binding affinity for C12-C22 acyl-CoA esters and participates in lipid metabolism. ACBP and its family of proteins have been found in all eukaryotes and some prokaryotes. Studies have described the function and structure of ACBP family proteins in mammals (such as humans and mice), plants (such as Oryza sativa, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Hevea brasiliensis) and yeast. However, little information on the structure and function of the proteins in filamentous fungi has been reported. This article concentrates on recent advances in the research of the ACBP family proteins in plants and mammals, especially in yeast, filamentous fungi (such as Monascus ruber and Aspergillus oryzae), and fungal pathogens (Aspergillus flavus, Cryptococcus neoformans). Furthermore, we discuss some problems in the field, summarize the binding characteristics of the ACBP family proteins in filamentous fungi and yeast, and consider the future of ACBP development.

PMID: 32164164 [PubMed]

Source: Industry