Gut fungal dysbiosis and altered bacterial-fungal interaction in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome: An explorative study.

Gut fungal dysbiosis and altered bacterial-fungal interaction in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome: An explorative study.

Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2020 May 25;:e13891

Authors: Hong G, Li Y, Yang M, Li G, Qian W, Xiong H, Bai T, Song J, Zhang L, Hou X

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Little is known about intestinal fungi in IBS patients whose gut bacteria have been investigated a lot. In order to explore causal relationship between IBS and gut mycobiome, and use gut fungi to diagnose or even treat IBS, further characterization of it in IBS is required.
METHODS: Fifty-five diarrhea-predominant IBS (D-IBS) patients fulfilling Rome III criteria, and 16 healthy controls (HC) were recruited. Fresh fecal samples were collected and used for 16s rRNA and ITS2 high-throughput sequencing. Diversity and composition of gut bacteria and fungi, as well as bacterial-fungal interactions in D-IBS patients, were characterized. Specific fungal taxa differentiating D-IBS from HC were recognized by LEfSe and RandomForest methods, and their association with clinical symptoms was assessed by Spearman’s correlation.
RESULTS: Diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome patients showed abnormal (IBS-dysbiosis) or normal (HC-like IBS) fecal bacterial structure and diversity compared with healthy controls. However, fecal fungal signatures differed absolutely between D-IBS and HC, which indicated a more susceptible alteration of gut fungi than bacteria in D-IBS. Fecal fungi showed significant correlations with IBS symptoms, especially Mycosphaerella, Aspergillus, Sporidiobolus, and Pandora which were identified to potentially differentiate D-IBS from HC. Moreover, compared with HC there were markedly declined bacterial-fungal interactions in D-IBS, in which Candida changed from negative to positive correlations with bacteria, and Eurotium changed from positive correlations to irrelevance, while Debaryomyces gained negative correlations with bacteria.
CONCLUSIONS: Gut fungal dysbiosis and altered bacterial-fungal interactions were present in patients with D-IBS, and gut fungi could be used to diagnose D-IBS.

PMID: 32449259 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Source: Industry