Validation of a vapor-phase advanced oxidation process for inactivating Listeria monocytogenes, its surrogate Lactobacillus fructivorans, and spoilage molds associated with green or red table grapes.

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Validation of a vapor-phase advanced oxidation process for inactivating Listeria monocytogenes, its surrogate Lactobacillus fructivorans, and spoilage molds associated with green or red table grapes.

J Food Sci. 2020 Aug 24;:

Authors: Hasani M, Wu F, Warriner K

Abstract
A method based on vapor-phase advanced oxidation process (AOP) for decontaminating red or green grapes was validated for inactivating Listeria monocytogenes and spoilage molds. A Central Composite Design (CCD) and Response Surface Methodology (RSM) were applied to determine the contribution of UV-C (254 nm) dose, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone concentration on the lethality toward Aspergillus niger spores (biodensiometer) and changes to the grape quality (firmness and color over 14-day post-treatment storage at 4 °C). A high UV-C dose (>129 mJ/cm2 ) or >4.0 % v/v hydrogen peroxide induced-blistering and darkening of grapes at the end of the storage period. Yet, an optimized AOP treatment (with regards to preserving grape quality) was derived to be 1.3% v/v hydrogen peroxide (5 mL/10 berries) with 9-mg ozone gas and a UV-C dose of 123 mJ/cm2 (10 s at UV-C intensity of 12 mW/cm2 ). A predictive model was constructed and verified based on the log reduction of A. niger spores and changes in quality characteristics of red grapes. The optimal AOP treatment supported a 1.6-log CFU/g reduction of Aspergillus spores and decreased L. monocytogenes counts by 3.92 ± 0.17 and 4.77 ± 0.30 log CFU/g on green and red grapes, respectively, that were not significantly different to the surrogate, Lactobacillus fructivorans. There was no significant difference in the reduction of L. monocytogenes with grapes arranged in a single or double layer. Botrytis cinerea counts were reduced by 1.08 to 1.35 log CFU/g using the optimized AOP treatment with no change in grape color or firmness during storage. A sensory panel could not differentiate AOP-treated grapes from nontreated controls although 3 of 15 panelists did note subtle flavor notes. PRACTICAL APPLICATION: Postharvest washing of fresh produce has limited efficacy in removing foodborne pathogens and spoilage microbes. This is especially relevant to berries, such as grapes, that are susceptible to spoilage following washing. The vapor-phase AOP treatment provides a supplemental or alternative approach for produce decontamination. However, the operating parameters need to be optimized to ensure that decontamination of grapes is not at the expense of quality. In the current study, this was achieved by ensuring a balance between hydrogen peroxide, ozone, and UV-C dose that form the elements of an AOP treatment.

PMID: 32839995 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Source: Industry