Absence of Azole Antifungal Resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus Isolated from Root Vegetables Harvested from UK Arable and Horticultural Soils.

Absence of Azole Antifungal Resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus Isolated from Root Vegetables Harvested from UK Arable and Horticultural Soils.

J Fungi (Basel). 2020 Oct 06;6(4):

Authors: van der Torre MH, Whitby C, Eades CP, Moore CB, Novak-Frazer L, Richardson MD, Rautemaa-Richardson R

Abstract
The emergence of azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus (ARAf) complicates the treatment of aspergillosis and can nearly double the mortality from invasive aspergillosis (IA). ARAf has been isolated from many different environmental sites and indoor environments and thus presents a significant risk for susceptible patients. Local surveillance of environmental ARAf can guide antifungal prescribing and improve patient outcomes. In this study, seventy-four soils samples collected from the surface of a variety of root vegetables from farm shops and private gardens covering a wide geographical area of the UK, were cultured to assess the presence of A. fumigatus, and the prevalence and nature of any resistance mechanisms. A high-throughput in-house antifungal susceptibility screening method was developed and validated using the EUCAST MIC reference method, E.DEF 9.3.1. A total of 146 isolates were recovered and analysed. Even though the study premise was that soil-covered root vegetables and other fresh produce could represent a conduit for ARAf exposure in vulnerable patients, no ARAf were found in the soil samples despite 55% of samples harbouring A. fumigatus. The sample type and screening method used could be suitable for more extensive monitoring of the soil to detect trends in the prevalence of ARAf.

PMID: 33036151 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Source: Industry