Migrating Lung Monocytes Internalize and Inhibit Growth of Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia.

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Migrating Lung Monocytes Internalize and Inhibit Growth of Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia.

Pathogens. 2020 Nov 24;9(12):

Authors: Schiefermeier-Mach N, Haller T, Geley S, Perkhofer S

Abstract
Monocytes are important players to combat the ubiquitously present fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. Recruitment of monocytes to sites of fungal A. fumigatus infection has been shown in vivo. Upon exposure to A. fumigatus in vitro, purified murine and human blood monocytes secrete inflammatory cytokines and fungicidal mediators. Mononuclear tissue phagocytes are phenotypically and functionally different from those circulating in the blood and their role in antifungal defenses is much less understood. In this study, we identified a population of migrating CD43+ monocytes in cells isolated from rat distal lungs. These cells are phenotypically different from alveolar macrophages and show distinct locomotory behavior on the surface of primary alveolar cells resembling previously described endothelial patrolling monocytes. Upon challenge, the CD43+ monocytes internalized A. fumigatus conidia resulting in inhibition of their germination and hyphal growth. Thus, migrating lung monocytes might play an important role in local defense against pulmonary pathogens.

PMID: 33255432 [PubMed]

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