Revealing of Non-Cultivable Bacteria Associated with the Mycelium of Fungi in the Kerosene-Degrading Community Isolated from the Contaminated Jet Fuel.

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Revealing of Non-Cultivable Bacteria Associated with the Mycelium of Fungi in the Kerosene-Degrading Community Isolated from the Contaminated Jet Fuel.

J Fungi (Basel). 2021 Jan 11;7(1):

Authors: Shapiro T, Chekanov K, Alexandrova A, Dolnikova G, Ivanova E, Lobakova E

Abstract
Fuel (especially kerosene) biodamage is a challenge for global industry. In aviation, where kerosene is a widely used type of fuel, its biodeterioration leads to significant damage. Six isolates of micromycetes from the TS-1 aviation kerosene samples were obtained. Their ability to grow on the fuel was studied, and the difference between biodegradation ability was shown. Micromycetes belonged to the Talaromyces, Penicillium, and Aspergillus genera. It was impossible to obtain bacterial isolates associated with their mycelium. However, 16S rRNA metabarcoding and microscopic observations revealed the presence of bacteria in the micromycete isolates. It seems to be that kerosene-degrading fungi were associated with uncultured bacteria. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes were abundant in the fungal cultures isolated from the TS-1 jet fuel samples. Most genera among these phyla are known as hydrocarbon degraders. Only bacteria-containing micromycete isolates were able to grow on the kerosene. Most likely, kerosene degradation mechanisms are based on synergism of bacteria and fungi.

PMID: 33440907 [PubMed]

Source: Industry